By Pradyot Patnaik

The definitive consultant to the harmful homes of chemical compounds

Correlating chemical constitution with toxicity to people and the surroundings, and the chemical constitution of compounds to their detrimental homes, A accomplished advisor to the harmful houses of chemical compounds, 3rd Edition permits clients to evaluate the toxicity of a substance even if no experimental facts exists. therefore, it bridges the distance among detrimental fabrics and chemistry. widely up-to-date and extended, this reference:

  • Examines organics, metals and inorganics, business solvents, universal gases, particulates, explosives, and radioactive components, protecting every thing from toxicity and carcinogenicity to flammability and explosive reactivity to dealing with and disposal practices
  • Arranges unsafe chemicals based on their chemical constructions and useful teams for simple reference
  • contains up-to-date details at the poisonous, flammable, and explosive houses of chemicals
  • Covers extra metals within the chapters on poisonous and reactive metals
  • Updates the edge publicity limits within the place of work air for a couple of elements
  • beneficial properties the newest details on business solvents and poisonous and flammable gases
  • comprises a variety of tables, formulation, and a thesaurus for fast reference

since it presents details that allows people with a chemistry historical past to accomplish exams with no previous facts, this finished reference appeals to chemists, chemical engineers, toxicologists, and forensic scientists, in addition to business hygienists, occupational physicians, Hazmat pros, and others in similar fields.Content:
Chapter 1 Acids, Carboxylic (pages 103–114):
Chapter 2 Acids, Mineral (pages 115–126):
Chapter three Acids, Peroxy (pages 127–133):
Chapter four Alcohols (pages 134–159):
Chapter five Aldehydes (pages 160–192):
Chapter 6 Alkalies (pages 193–199):
Chapter 7 Alkaloids (pages 200–234):
Chapter eight Amines, Aliphatic (pages 235–250):
Chapter nine Amines, fragrant (pages 251–268):
Chapter 10 Asbestos (pages 269–276):
Chapter eleven Azo Dyes (pages 277–285):
Chapter 12 Chlorohydrins (pages 286–293):
Chapter thirteen Cyanides, natural (Nitriles) (pages 294–316):
Chapter 14 Cyanides, Inorganic (pages 317–335):
Chapter 15 Dioxin and comparable Compounds (pages 336–347):
Chapter sixteen Epoxy Compounds (pages 348–369):
Chapter 17 Esters (pages 370–389):
Chapter 18 Ethers (pages 390–401):
Chapter 19 Gases, universal poisonous, and Flammable (pages 402–409):
Chapter 20 Glycol Ethers (pages 410–424):
Chapter 21 Haloethers (pages 425–437):
Chapter 22 Halogenated Hydrocarbons (pages 438–469):
Chapter 23 Halogens, Halogen Oxides, and Interhalogen Compounds (pages 470–483):
Chapter 24 Heterocyclic Compounds (pages 484–495):
Chapter 25 Hydrocarbons, Aliphatic and Alicyclic (pages 496–515):
Chapter 26 Hydrocarbons, fragrant (pages 516–536):
Chapter 27 commercial Solvents (pages 537–550):
Chapter 28 Isocyanates, natural (pages 551–567):
Chapter 29 Ketones (pages 568–591):
Chapter 30 steel Acetylides and Fulminates (pages 592–597):
Chapter 31 steel Alkoxides (pages 598–601):
Chapter 32 steel Alkyls (pages 602–612):
Chapter 33 steel Azides (pages 613–621):
Chapter 34 steel Carbonyls (pages 622–629):
Chapter 35 steel Hydrides (pages 630–642):
Chapter 36 Metals, Reactive (pages 643–649):
Chapter 37 Metals, poisonous (pages 650–668):
Chapter 38 Mustard fuel and Sulfur Mustards (pages 669–673):
Chapter 39 Nerve Gases (pages 674–690):
Chapter forty Nitro Explosives (pages 691–703):
Chapter forty-one Oxidizers (pages 704–714):
Chapter forty two Particulates (pages 715–718):
Chapter forty three Peroxides, natural (pages 719–740):
Chapter forty four insecticides and Herbicides: category, constitution, and research (pages 741–745):
Chapter forty five insecticides, Carbamate (pages 746–761):
Chapter forty six insecticides, Organochlorine (pages 762–781):
Chapter forty seven insecticides, Organophosphorus (pages 782–803):
Chapter forty eight Herbicides, Chlorophenoxy Acid (pages 804–810):
Chapter forty nine Herbicides, Triazine (pages 811–816):
Chapter 50 Herbicides, Urea (pages 817–820):
Chapter fifty one Phenols (pages 821–833):
Chapter fifty two Phosphorus and Its Compounds (pages 834–853):
Chapter fifty three Polychlorinated Biphenyls (pages 854–862):
Chapter fifty four Radon and Radioactive components (pages 863–866):
Chapter fifty five Sulfate Esters (pages 867–871):
Chapter fifty six Sulfur?Containing Organics (Miscellaneous) (pages 872–881):
Chapter fifty seven Miscellaneous ingredients (pages 882–898):

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Extra resources for A Comprehensive Guide to the Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances, (3rd) Third Edition

Example text

Thus n-amyl or n-butyl acetates are more toxic than ethyl or n-propyl acetates. The first members of certain classes 25 of compounds show the highest toxicity. Ethylene oxide formaldehyde, or formic acid are more toxic than are other members of their families. In a few instances, certain toxic properties exhibited by the first member of a group are not displayed by other members in the same group. For example, certain toxic effects shown by methanol or benzene are not manifested by other lower aliphatic alcohols or alkyl benzenes.

Hvap values may be found in most chemical data handbooks. If Hvap is known and the vapor pressure of a substance is known at one temperature, we can calculate the vapor pressure at any other temperature. Similarly, from the vapor pressure and Hvap , we can calculate the boiling point of the substance. 31 J/molÐK); and C is a constant. This is known as the Clausius–Clapeyron equation. 2 torr (Use a calculator to determine the ex of the given natural logarithm, to obtain the number. 2 torr. Problem 2.

Thus n-amyl or n-butyl acetates are more toxic than ethyl or n-propyl acetates. The first members of certain classes 25 of compounds show the highest toxicity. Ethylene oxide formaldehyde, or formic acid are more toxic than are other members of their families. In a few instances, certain toxic properties exhibited by the first member of a group are not displayed by other members in the same group. For example, certain toxic effects shown by methanol or benzene are not manifested by other lower aliphatic alcohols or alkyl benzenes.

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